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Broadcasting Online Talk Writing

E-copywriting for all your audiences: AmbITion talk now online

On Thursday I headed to Glasgow to give the talk mentioned here a few weeks ago, Now you’re talking! – e-copywriting for all your audiences for the busy team behind the AmbITion network.

The presentation aimed to answer the question of whether content for websites should be written for different audiences, in different styles. To summarise, the answer has to be yes…and no.

Yes, we need to keep different audiences in mind when putting together a new website, and that content should be placed in sections which mean something to them. But at the same time we need to be wary about varying our tone of voice on different pages as this can be confusing.

I suggested that the main company site remains consistent but that different audiences can be reached across different platforms, with Twitter and Facebook two places that allow the tone of voice of the company to shine through.

The full talk is available on the AmbITion site now:

Ambition talk

Thanks again to Hannah and her team for inviting me to speak and the audience for listening so patiently for almost an hour.

Categories
Broadcasting Online TV

From Scotland to the world: bringing the STV archive to YouTube

STV Player

I thought it was time I blogged about a new project I’m working on with STV, the broadcaster which produces programming to over three and a half million viewers across Scotland each week.

It was in June that STV announced their deal with YouTube which would initally bring 2,500 hours of their programming to the site, and I covered the story for ReelScotland in August when David Tennant’s first TV appearance and a little-known Alfred Hitchcock documentary arrived on the channel. That’s alongside various brand new series which are still making a name for themselves with audiences.

After meeting with STV Head of Digital, Alistair Brown, to discuss the project in more detail, it became clear that the work which has been going on behind the scenes at the broadcaster for the last few months is not only going to be of interest to existing fans of archive TV, but to those who haven’t even heard of older dramas, documentaries and news items, either because they’re too young or because STV programmes weren’t transmitted in their region or country.

As Alistair noted in a recent interview with The Drum, the future broadcast schedule for many viewers will be heavily influenced by online. It seems likely that as we put together our own schedules, pulling in programmes from various sources which appeal to us, classic TV broadcasts will sit alongside the latest drama and entertainment on our computer/iPad/iPhone screens:

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My role in all this is to take a look at the bigger picture of what’s available in the STV archives and to see how the most can be made out of it online. As I try to do with much of my writing/reviewing, I want to put some context to these series, explaining how they came to be made and highlighting aspects which may otherwise go unnoticed.

We’ll be creating new content around old, involving production teams from the past wherever possible rather than simply lifting quotes from Wikipedia. In fact, in at least one case, we’ll be creating a Wikipedia page from scratch for a show which to my mind should have been one of Scotland’s longest running series but which tragically ended after just six episodes.

With this project STV wants to make Scottish programmes appeal to a wider audience, backing up the the channel’s motto of “From Scotland to the world” – in this new online era that’s perhaps more apt, and achievable, than ever.

I’ll write more about the project in the coming weeks, but in the meantime keep an eye on my Twitter feed and the STV YouTube channel for more announcements.